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m88 asia_tỷ lệ cá cược bóng đá_giải thích tỷ lệ cá cược bóng đá

Russell Wangersky writes: "Now, with the changes in cannabis laws, it looks like our provincial liquor monopoly is getting into the dial-a-dope business as well, but you’ll be dialing this dealer on the internet, and delivery will be even more convenient." — Stock photo
Provinces will control the distribution of legalized cannabis, set the wholesale and retail prices and, in this province, even legislate that the Newfoundland and Labrador Liquor Corp. will be the only legal online supplier. — 123RF Stock photo

When it comes to sins, governments like to monopolize both the business and the profits.

That’s why provincial governments are still having such a hard time agreeing to allow citizens to transport alcohol across provincial borders, because it interferes with the cash cow of provincial and territorial liquor agencies.

That’s why cigarettes have their own hefty tax regime and special legislation, including having police forces dedicate resources to tobacco smuggling.

And it’s happening again with cannabis sales: provinces will control the distribution, set the wholesale and retail prices and, in this province, even legislate that the Newfoundland and Labrador Liquor Corp. will be the only legal online supplier for cannabis products. (Enforcement of that part of the province’s cannabis law will be interesting; right now, it’s illegal to sell cannabis products, but online sellers are regularly shipping to this province and using Canada Post to deliver their product.)

The general rule is that governments like to claim they are the only ones who can ethically and responsibly handle the sales of such products. Truth is, though, that what the governments really like are the huge markups and tax windfalls.

Sadly, for governments, at least one of the sins isn’t going to be as easy to control.

Tuesday, the Quebec government lost a court battle over a piece of legislation it passed in 2016. After the online gambling platform run by that province’s lottery corporation started losing money, the Quebec government drafted a law to make it illegal for gambling to be carried on the internet in Quebec, unless the games were approved by that province’s gaming authority.

The general rule is that governments like to claim they are the only ones who can ethically and responsibly handle the sales of such products. Truth is, though, that what the governments really like are the huge markups and tax windfalls.

As always, the justification wasn’t because the lottery agency was losing money; no, the government argued that in order to protect the health and safety of Quebecers, the government had to run the show.

The judge in the case disagreed: “The veritable character (of the law) is to prevent gaming websites not exploited by the government from being accessible, and not about protecting consumers or their health.”

In this region, the Atlantic Lottery Corporation has been warning about the impact of online gambling eroding its bottom line for years, and has set up its own online offerings, with an eye to larger scale operations in the future.

The one thing it won’t have, if it does go ahead? It won’t have the ease of operating as an internet monopoly.

And just to loop that decision back to another piece of law in this province: the government of Newfoundland and Labrador probably can’t legally block advertising from online cannabis sellers either.

Business is so much simpler and profitable when you just legislate yourself as the only legal operator.

But sometimes, you just can’t do it.

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